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There’s no place like home at River Glen!

By News

A daughter of one of our residents sent our staff this lovely note:

To all of the River Glen staff,

Yesterday my mother returned to River Glen after a short stay in the hospital.  I was so happy when she described how she was welcomed when she returned.  Mom said:

“So many people greeted me and said they were glad I was back.”

“The concierge at the front desk gave me a big hug.”

“The waitress in the dining hall was so excited to see me.”

“The nurses were glad to see me”  (Mom thinks everyone is a nurse).  I know she was including the aides in this comment.

“So many of my friends said they missed me.”

“I guess people like me since they were so glad to see me.”

I am crying as I write this email because Mom was very unhappy, confused  and agitated in the hospital, yet all  of those memories were erased when she came through the River Glen doors.  I am so happy she has warm, loving, caring people to be with.

 

We’re happy she’s here too! 

8 Healthy Habits for Seniors

By News

It’s a fact: People celebrate more birthdays now than ever before. According to data from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), by 2050 there could be as many as one million individuals living in the U.S. who are 100 years old or older.

Want to be one of them? Follow these suggestions offered by the NIA.

1. Exercise. A good idea at any age, exercising as you get older helps reduce the risk for disabilities and age-related diseases. Exercise helps keep you limber—and you’ll feel more energetic, too!
2. Eat healthy foods. Don’t forgo good nutrition: It’s the fuel your body needs to function well. Ask the dietitian at your grocery store or your senior living community about healthy food choices and learn more at Choose My Plate.
3. Watch your weight. Weighing too much (or too little) can impact your long-term health, so follow your doctor’s recommendations to find the ideal weight for you.
4. Stop smoking. Even if you used to smoke, there are health benefits once you quit. Forgo other tobacco products as well.
5. Quiz yourself. Keeping your brain active with puzzles, games, and other challenges can help you stay sharp as you age.
6. Practice wellness. Treat yourself to simple pleasures to stay well and healthy. Socialize with those you enjoy, get plenty of sleep, and express gratitude for what you have.
7. See your doctor. Regular checkups can help you stay on top of your health.
8. Drink only in moderation if you consume alcohol.

As with any activity, check with your doctor before making changes to your lifestyle or diet. Life Care Services cares for more than 33,000 older adults who live in the communities we manage. Contact us to learn more about finding a senior living community that can support your overall well-being as you age.

It’s always an A PLUS day with Bill Cho comes to River Glen!

By News

Bill Cho’s United Taekwondo Center in St. Charles writes:  “What a blessing to share the morning with these beautiful people!  Grand Master Cho shared tips to strengthen their bodies and souls.  And the joy, excitement and pride filled the room as they challenged themselves and worked up the courage to break through the boards.  They were amazing!  It was overwhelmingly contagious and we are still smiling from ear to ear.  Thank you to our friends at River Glen of St. Charles for allowing us to be part of your day!”

 

How seniors benefit from volunteering

By News

Senior living communities have a lot to offer seniors—but one opportunity may surprise you. Many residents become active volunteers. Seniors have time and talent to offer, and by joining together with other residents, can make an impact with their volunteering. The opportunities for getting involved can be wide-ranging, from helping young children read, to working in a communal garden, to gathering items for charity.

If Mom lives in an independent living or assisted living community or is thinking of making a move, encourage her to think about getting—and staying—involved. These activities aren’t just beneficial for those being helped, but they’re beneficial for her, too. Here’s how:

  1. PROMOTES HEALTHY ACTIVITY 

Mom may be encouraged to go on walks or participate in group activities in her assisted living community, but volunteering adds an extra measure of involvement. Donating perishables to the foodbank or walking around a museum as a volunteer can help Mom stay active and maintain a healthy level of physical fitness that will help stave off injuries or diseases as she ages. Better still, when she is volunteering, she may not even notice she is exercising.

  1. Offers social benefits

Social interaction is essential to healthy aging. Volunteering is a great way for Mom to connect with other residents and to meet new people, too. Through these interactions, you may notice her self-esteem improve as she flourishes socially within the community.

  1. Provides a sense of purpose

Through her volunteer efforts, Mom can build connections with more people, both within and outside the community. Volunteering can instill a sense of purpose in her because she knows she’s being relied on. And, after the task is done, she will also gain a sense of accomplishment for her role in serving others.

  1. Prevents isolation

Donating time is a great way to enhance Mom’s social health. Being surrounded by others who share her volunteer interests can help reduce the risk of isolation and the depression and illnesses that often accompany it. Volunteering can give her a reason to get more involved in the community to share her wisdom and talents.

Help Mom make a difference in her community—and her own well-being—by encouraging her to volunteer. Life Care Services communities encourage opportunities that help residents stay involved. Find the community that fits Mom’s needs and lifestyle today by contacting us.

4 Mistakes to Avoid When Researching Retirement Communities

By News, Uncategorized

If you’re beginning to look for retirement communities for your dad, will you know where to begin? While the search may seem daunting, it’s important to be thorough: Choosing the right community—especially if he needs the support of an assisted living residence—will impact his quality of life as well as his happiness.

Save yourself a little time—and wasted energy—by avoiding these 4 mistakes that people commonly make when searching for assisted living communities:

1. Not being realistic

The number one thing to keep in mind when looking at a potential retirement community is that this will be Dad’s home. There are many options to consider, but your job is to remain realistic about Dad’s wants and needs. Look for a retirement or assisted living community that can support him now as well as in the future. Moving Dad from place to place as he ages is an expensive proposition—not to mention one that will take an emotional toll on both of you.

2. Not including family members

While this move matters the most for Dad, it’s also a big move for your family. Even if you’re the “point person” on the search, discuss your options with him and your family members. Together, discuss the retirement community and if it has the right mix of activities, amenities and services for Dad—as well as if it feels comfortable to him. Including everyone in the discussion can be helpful as he makes his final decision.

3. Waiting until the last minute

If possible, don’t wait to take action until the need for assisted living is urgent. Start searching for options early on so you can thoroughly research the retirement communities and narrow down your top options. Waiting until the last minute can cause you to act under pressure, incur unnecessary stress and potentially select a place that’s not a good fit for Dad. If and when the time comes, it will be much easier to make the move to assisted living if you already have desirable options in mind.

4. Not doing your research

Don’t just scratch the surface when researching: Thoroughly dive into all that the retirement communities have to offer. From the outside, several communities may seem comparable and a good fit Dad, but what do they each offer? Think of Dad’s needs—now and in the future—when researching places. Will he need transportation? Individualized services? Community activities? These are all questions to consider when choosing the right retirement community. Take the time to visit potential communities to meet with the staff and see how residents interact.

As you begin looking for Dad’s new assisted living community, you may find you have more questions than answers. Life Care Services can help. Contact us to learn more and request a tour.

Doing what’s best for dad and managing family dynamics.

By News, Uncategorized

If Dad’s health or capabilities are declining, it may be best for him to get the care he needs in an assisted living community setting. For some families, that can be a difficult choice to make. But while you may be on board about getting him the assistance he needs, are your siblings?

Denial can be a tricky thing to handle, especially when it comes to deciding what’s best for a loved one. Your siblings may not recognize the level of care Dad needs or may not agree on how best to get it. Disagreements also can arise over the responsibilities that each sibling will have or the costs of his care—but it’s essential to discuss the next steps with your family members.

First and foremost, keep your conversations focused on Dad’s safety and care. Try these 5 tips for discussing Dad’s situation with siblings who may be reluctant to see his actual needs.

1. Plan a meeting.

Don’t blindside your siblings about the need for Dad’s care by simply bringing it up in an everyday conversation. Plan a time for you and your family members to meet so you can express your point of view and listen to what they have to say. During this meeting, talk about Dad’s current state of health, his projected health and how that may affect Dad’s quality of life, then discuss why these may mean he needs more care. You may need to have more than one conversation to allow everyone to feel like their opinions are heard.

2. Ask for help.

Be specific about Dad’s needs and your suggestions when speaking with your siblings. If they’re denying that he needs help, provide them with examples. Ask them to step in and help with simple things, such as tidying up his house or taking him to the grocery store. As they participate in these activities, they may begin to recognize changes in Dad that they’d not seen before.

3. Speak to a doctor.

If you can’t get past your siblings’ denial, it may be time to get a doctor involved. See if you can obtain permission—such as a health care power of attorney— to review Dad’s medical records. Discuss what’s in Dad’s medical reports and what the doctor suggests. Bringing in the opinions of a third-party medical professional often helps those in denial understand your concerns about Dad’s health.

4. Visit a senior living community.

Do you sense your siblings are resisting Dad’s move to assisted living because they hold outdated impressions of what that setting looks like? Ease their fears by scheduling a tour of the community with your siblings so that they can become familiar with a modern assisted living community. Let them know that they have a say in where Dad lives.

5. Secure mediation assistance.

If it’s been difficult to get your point across or come to a final decision, professional mediation may be the next step. There are many different mediation services that can help to lead you and your siblings to a resolution. Start with a compassionate geriatric care manager who can answer questions and allay fears.

In emotional situations such as Dad’s next life step, it’s important to separate your expectations from those of your siblings. They may be coping differently than you during this time, so being accepting, understanding, and open is essential to the decision-making process.

To learn more about the communities we manage or to request a tour, contact Life Care Services.